Interviews Reviews

THE LAST VICEREINE

Interview on the Edwina Jawahar relationship in She The People TV (India)

Rhiannon Jenkins’ Novel Revisits Much-debated Edwina-Jawahar Relationship

How to Fictionalize the Jawaharlal Nehru Edwina Mountbatten Affair. The DailyO

http://www.dailyo.in/arts/jawaharlal-nehru-edwina-mountbatten-love-affair-mahatma-gandhi-india-partition/story/1/18868.html

The Last Vicereine book excerpt.  Letty Wallace, fictional aide to Edwina Mountbatten talks to Jawahar shortly after Edwina’s death.

http://www.dailyo.in/arts/jawaharlal-nehru-edwina-mountbatten-fiction-relationship/story/1/18932.html

 

 

 THE WOMAN WHO LOST CHINA

Rhiannon talks to American talk show host, Cyrus Webb on Conversations Live.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/cyruswebbpresents/2013/08/05/author-rhiannon-jenkins-tsang-on-conversations-live

http://www.leftlion.co.uk/articles.cfm/title/rhiannon-jenkins-tsang/id/6125#.Uuo5LzqYbm4

http://www.nottinghampost.com/Woman-Lost-China/story-19317810-detail/story.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/10162707/Flights-of-the-imagination-Rana-Mitter-on-books-about-China.html

Reviews of The Woman Who Lost China

“Rhiannon Jenkins Tsang has a created a masterpiece and one that that you will remember for years to come…A page-turning, realistic story that spans a century and three continents.”—Susan Blumberg-Kason, author of Good Chinese Wife: Love Affair with China Gone Wrong. 

“Turbulance and Tension: Through the narrative of one family, Jenkins Tsang exposes the turbulence and tension that a change of regime and a turnover of military leadership can produce. The reader observes households cared for by others and families caring for one another, oftentimes with confidence, yet without comprehension. Drama, and even trauma, produces a shifting panorama of power and passion. This book is a boon to all families rent by civil war and civil change by an author that understands her subject.” Jorja Davis, author and reviewer

“Rhiannon Jenkins Tsang’s novel is both impeccably researched and beautifully written, demonstrating her unique gift for bringing normally inaccessible periods of Chinese history to a Western audience. The rich and descriptive language of The Woman Who Lost China paints a vivid picture of life in civil war-stricken mainland China and Hong Kong through an original tale of love, war and revenge. A must-read for the modern China historian and a thoroughly enjoyable story with an unexpected twist for China fiction enthusiasts.” The China Scholar.com